Posts tagged ‘Election Day’

Midterms 2018

I read somewhere that there’s an election tomorrow.

Actually, unless you haven’t turned on any TV, scrolled through any social media feed, or driven anywhere and seen any billboards or yard signs for the past few months, it’s difficult not to know that there’s an election tomorrow.

For a midterm election, the rhetoric has been unusually hot.  The stakes feel unusually high.  And, if early voting reports are any indication from across my home state of Texas, people are turning out in record numbers because they are unusually engaged.

Sadly, though much of the voter turnout is surely driven by a sense of civic privilege and responsibility, at least some of it is driven by fear and anger.  The thought of having the “other party” or the “other candidate” in power – whichever or whoever the “other party” or the “other candidate” is for you – terrifies and enrages some folks.  Civic privilege and responsibility take a backseat to despising and disparaging one’s political enemies.

George Washington, in his farewell address of 1796, warned:

The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism.

Sound familiar?

Do we live in a political climate marked by “the alternate domination of one faction over another”?  Do we ever engage with and exhibit a “spirt of revenge”?  George Washington calls this kind of political fist fighting “a frightful despotism.”  Why?   Because rather than honestly and thoughtfully debating the ideas and principles necessary to maintain any robust republic, we begin to bludgeon and berate other people we see only as evil enemies.  We trade our humanity and humility for indignation and domination.

Early each Saturday, I go for a 5 am stroll, cup of coffee in hand, around my neighborhood.  This hour of the morning may seem crazy, especially since it is the weekend, but it can’t be that crazy – or, at least, that’s what I tell myself – because I’m not the only one out walking.  Each Saturday, my neighbors a couple doors down are also out, walking their dog.  We wish each other a good morning and, occasionally, we catch up on neighborhood news.

I noticed the other day that in my neighbors’ yard is a sign for the Senate candidate from Texas for whom I did not vote.  I have some deeply held principled differences with this candidate and I gladly voted for his opponent.  And yet somehow, despite our differing candidate preferences, my neighbors and I still manage to like each other and care for each other and talk to each other.  Why?  Because the same principles that lead me to vote in certain ways also remind me that it is “self-evident that all men are created equal” and are therefore worthy of my respect and care even if I disagree with their political positions.

I’m not averse to good political humor and satire.  Sometimes, it’s the only way to stay sane in what can often feel like a political circus.  I am also all for folks arguing forcibly and persuasively for positions, principles, and even particular politicians as they see fit.  And I think it is honorable to go out and vote.  And tomorrow, we’ll have the opportunity to do just that.  But remember, through every joke that is made, debate that is had, and vote that is cast, we are still called to love our neighbors.

I read that somewhere too.

November 5, 2018 at 6:15 am Leave a comment

Election Day 2012 – It’s Almost Here

Election Day is tomorrow.  I am, as I’m sure you are, praying for our country and for her leaders.  I am also praying that much of the fear that surrounds this election will be calmed by the peace of God that transcends all human understanding (cf. Philippians 4:7).

This week, my blog is a simple one.  Yesterday in Adult Bible Class, I talked about Mark 12:13-17 with a special emphasis on what Jesus says about paying taxes and honoring God in verse 17:  “Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s and to God what is God’s.”  I wanted to put into transcript form (with some slight editing for the sake of readability) my conclusion from Adult Bible Class.  For as we head into voting booths across our land, I think it’s important to reiterate what we talked about – that no matter who occupies the Oval Office, there is only one Occupant on the throne of heaven.  And that alone should be enough to quell our fears and give us hope.  Here is what I said:

I’m going to go on the record today and say that I think it’s time for us to have a smaller government.  But when I say that – before you get too excited or too angry depending on your political persuasion – I’m not talking about tax policy and how we’re going to pay for this or that government program.  I’m not talking about what social programs we should or should not keep.  I’m not talking about whether we should be for or against the Affordable Health Care Act.  I’m not talking about the size of government in Washington at all.  I’m talking about the size of government in our imaginations.  For government – and its attendant greatness or ghoulishness – has captured far too large a place in our hearts and minds.

Here’s what’s happened:  whether Republican or Democrat, many people have bought into this myth that if the wrong guy makes it into office – which always happens to be the guy they’re not voting for – that’s the end of the line.  That’s the demise of our nation.  That’s the disintegration of everything good and moral and noble and righteous in our world.  And people get all revved up and riled up, determined to save what is most important to them by getting their guy into office.

Folks, when this happens, you’re not voting for a president, you’re seeking a Messiah.  And that job has already been filled.

I love what a New York Times columnist named Ross Douthat writes about this:

The party in power claims to be restoring American greatness; the party out of power insists that the current administration is actually deeply un-American – heretics in the holy temple of the U.S.A., you might say – and promises to take our country back…And the country keeps cycling through savior figures, hoping each time that this one will be the One that we’ve been waiting for.[1]

Folks, the One we’ve been waiting for has already come.  And His name is not Barack Obama.  His name is not Mitt Romney.  His name is Jesus Christ.  And, by the way, not only has He come, He’ll come again.

So cast your vote. Be a good citizen.  But remember that even if Caesar gets the coins, Jesus holds your heart.

And that’s what matters most.


[1] Ross Douthat, Bad Religion:  How We Became a Nation of Heretics (New York:  Free Press, 2012), 269.

November 5, 2012 at 5:15 am 3 comments


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